The Real Dangers Of Artificial Light To Your Health

Photo credit: bigstock.com

Photo credit: bigstock.com

The Science Behind Blue Light Exposure

Metabolism and circadian rhythm are inexplicably tied to our health and well-being. The scientific data is clear — blue spectrum light exposure impacts our ability to function. It disrupts our natural cycle and plays with our internal body clocks. The cycle of a normal 24-hour day is important to several factors, including physical and mental health. This cycle impacts all life on earth, including humans, and was long thought to be part of our neurological system. Recent studies have discarded that focus and placed it on the impact that light has on our bodies. The results have been stunning and have developed new treatments for those suffering from deficiencies associated with exposure to blue spectrum and blue light.

One important hormone has been particularly impacted by blue light, and that is melatonin. Melatonin is often associated by the sleeping hours we keep, which for most people are the nighttime hours. However, melatonin levels can be impacted by exposure to blue light.

We’ve all spent the night time hours working on our computers for school or work, so we’ve experienced this blue light exposure first hand. If you happen to work from home or work a night shift, you may want to look into amber shades or shields that block blue light from your screen. If you’re working on a phone, there are some apps that create amber filters during the night time hours to help your brain adapt to its natural cycles.

If you can’t find a filter or app, you may want to consider switching off the computer entirely in the period before bedtime. Take a digital break, and let your body adjust to its natural cycle. Doing so means you’ll get a more restful sleep and be more energized on the day after.

 

READ ALSO: The Truth About CFL and LED Energy-Saving Light Bulbs

 

It is hard, if not impossible, to get away from the artificial light in our daily lives, but that doesn’t mean we have to be a slave to it. Look into the options available to you or take a break from your screen whenever possible. The result will be a more natural rhythm in your daily life and a healthier way to live.

References:

www.health.harvard.edu

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

www.umm.edu

PrevPage: 2 of 2Next