8 Terrific Exercises To Get Rid Of Jell-O Arms

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After 40, almost everyone, especially women, tend to develop flabby upper arms, sometimes called jello arms. This is an embarrassing problem that can have you avoiding sleeveless clothing or a bathing suit.

The jiggly parts of your arms are the triceps, the large muscles that are on the back of your arms. These muscles are what are responsible for you being able to straighten out your arms.

The two main reasons people get jello arms are age and body fat. Our skin tends to become looser as it loses its elasticity. We also lose muscle mass as we age. These two facts alone give almost everyone flabby upper arms after 40 unless they take steps to keep the triceps firm.

Of course body fat is also a contributing factor. Losing even just five percent of your body weight will help tremendously with those Jell-O arms, but losing weight is not enough. You will still need to keep those triceps strong and firm to keep your upper arms from developing lives of their own!

We have put together eight of the best exercises you can do right at home. A couple of two- or four-pound weights will help but they aren’t necessary.

What are you waiting for? Start doing these exercises today, and you could have beautifully firm arms just in time to wear that sleeveless party dress!

 

1. Reverse Curl Ups

These will actually help your biceps, which is the muscle on the front of the arm but is also important for beautiful arms.

Stand with your feet about shoulder width apart. You can hold a dumbbell in each hand if you like. The dumbbell should be facing forward, with your palms against the outside of your thigh. Without bending your wrists, curl up both hands to your shoulders, and then slowly lower them back down. This is one rep. Start with two sets of 10 reps for each arm and work up to three sets of 20 reps per arm.

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Photo credit: bigstock.com

Photo credit: bigstock.com

2. The Triceps Chair Dip

You will need a sturdy, stable chair or step ladder for this exercise. Turn your back to the chair as if you were going to sit. Put your hands shoulder width apart on the seat of the chair with your butt just resting on the edge of the chair. Your legs should be about hip width apart, slightly bent. Push your behind off the chair and lower your body towards the floor using your arms. Go as low as possible by bending your elbows, then return to start. You will definitely feel the tension in your triceps’! Don’t feel badly if you can’t go very low at first. As your arms become stronger, you will be able to go lower. Start with five reps, then work your way up to 20.

 

3. The Crab Dip

Sit on the floor with your legs bent and your feet about shoulder width apart in front of you. Place your hand behind you, fingers facing forward towards your feet, directly beneath your shoulders. Don’t lock out your elbows, but try to extend your arms so that you raise your hips and your butt off the mat. You won’t be able to move more than an inch or two, but that’s OK. Push yourself up and down off the mat using only your arms, not your hips. Start with 15 reps and work yourself up to two sets of 24 reps.

 

4. Plain Old Push Ups

You know how these are done. Get down on the floor with your hands directly under your shoulders, elbows close to your sides. Lower yourself to the floor, then back up to the start position. If this is too difficult at first, do “girlie” pushups by putting your knees on the floor. Be sure to let your arms do most of the work. Start with 10 reps and work yourself up to three sets of 10 reps.

 

5. One Arm Push Up

Lie down on your right side with your knees slightly bend. Put your right hand on your left shoulder. Put your left hand on the floor. Press with your left hand onto the floor and lift your upper body off the floor. Repeat 10 times, and then switch sides.

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Photo credit: bigstock.com

Photo credit: bigstock.com

6. Kickbacks

This exercise works best with a light two-pound weight. Hold the dumbbells in your hands and kneel on the floor. Bend your torso forward from the hips and bend your elbows at a 90 degree angle. Extend your arms backwards so that your palms are facing each other. You should feel the tension in the back of your arms pretty quickly. Keep your arms close to your side. Start with 10 reps and work your way up to three sets of 10 reps.

 

7. The Bent Row

Stand up and put your feet about shoulder width apart. Bend your knees slightly while you bend your upper body forwards at the hips. Keep your spine neutral and watch your lower back. Your palms should be directly under your shoulders. Bend your elbows backwards while lifting your arms towards the sides of your chest. Your shoulder blades will be pulled towards each other. Lower your dumbbells in a controlled movement. You should feel the tension in your triceps. Start with 10 reps and work yourself up to three sets of 10 reps.

 

RELATED: 12 Proven Natural Remedies to Lighten Dark Underarms (#4 is Super Easy!)

 

8. Triceps Extensions

You can do this exercise either lying on the floor or standing up. Dumbbells are helpful here.

If you want to stand:

Stand with your knees slightly bent, not locked. Put your elbows next to your ears with a dumbbell in each hand. Straighten your arms so that your weights are overhead. Keep your elbows close as possible to your head to ensure that your arms are doing the work. Return to start. Repeat 10 to 15 times.

If you lie on the floor:

Lie down on your back and raise your arms above your chest. Keeping your elbows slightly bent (don’t lock them). Bend your elbows so that they are at a 90 degree angle and the weight will touch the floor. Your elbows should be on either side of your head. Return to the start position. Repeat 10 to 15 times.

You don’t have to do every one of these exercises every day, but doing at least two or three each day will only take a few minutes and it will help you to get rid of those flabby jello arms quickly.

 

References:

http://www.exercyse.org

http://growingstronger.nutrition.tufts.edu

http://www.health.com