Energy Drinks: Beyond Dangerous, They Can Be Deadly!

Photo credit: bigstock.com

Photo credit: bigstock.com

Energy drinks in particular are making combinations of sugar and caffeine in such high quantities that it is causing people health problems. An average 500ml can have as much as 160mgs of caffeine. This is the equivalent of 4 cans of soda. It can also contain as much as 13 teaspoons of sugar. Pour thirteen teaspoons of sugar in a glass to get an idea about how much that is. You will be shocked by the sight of it.

Some retailers have placed a voluntary ban on the sale of these drinks to children under the age of 16, but there is no actual law preventing it. One government advisor warned that energy drinks were just another type of drug.

One celebrity mother would agree. X-Factor judge Sharon Osbourne said that she placed the blame for her daughter’s recent seizure directly on energy drinks. Kelly Osbourne spent 5 days in the hospital after having a seizure and collapsing.

Teachers across the country are telling us that children who drink these popular drinks report feeling sick, dizzy, and shaky and exhibit hyperactive behavior. Some children are reportedly bringing them to school and consuming two or three of them during a typical school day.

Many students are opting to put an energy drink can in their backpack and drinking that rather than eat breakfast. One survey found that one in 20 teens goes to school with at least one can in their backpack.

The British Soft Drinks Association states that energy drinks should not be sold in schools, but surveys have found that many school sell energy drinks.

Sugar-free energy drinks are no better. They still contain high levels of caffeine, and aspartame is hardly considered to be a healthy alternative to sugar.

 

READ ALSO: Killing You Slowly: Energy Drinks

 

Don’t be fooled by cool and clever marketing ploys designed to make youngsters think that these are harmless ways to stay jolted. Explain the dangers of these drinks to your youngsters and avoid energy drinks. They don’t contain anything that the human body needs.

References:

www.brown.edu

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