What You Need To Know About Ovarian Cancer

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Ongoing research

Tumour marker blood tests are used to detect the possible presence of cancer in various parts of the body.

Those that have proved specifically effective are the CA15-3 test for breast cancer, and the CA19-9 test for gastro-intestinal cancers. The CA-125 test is more useful for monitoring the progression of some cancers including ovarian cancer. However, recent research has revealed that scientists are conducting experiments in an attempt to find a tumour marker which will relate better to early detection of ovarian cancer.

Studies have shown that because ovarian cancer is more likely to start in the cells covering the tips of the fallopian tubes than in the outer covering of the ovary, a tumour marker which could identify unusual activity in these tubal cells, would be of enormous benefit. The key for women with ovarian cancer to survive at least 5 years is undoubtedly early detection and treatment.

 

Good news

The good news is that if markers are found which relate to the tubal cells, then blood tests, tissue samples, and pap smears, will greatly increase the chances of early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. With regard to pap smears, at this moment, they do not test for or identify, ovarian cancer.

Recent studies have also shown that in the past, surgeons performing hysterectomies have tended to leave healthy ovaries as well as fallopian tubes intact. Thanks to research, healthy ovaries still remain untouched, but many surgeons now remove the fallopian tubes as a means of lowering the risk of ovarian cancer.

 

READ ALSO: 11 Surprising Things That Can Be Causing Cancer Video

 

Conclusion

The lives of so many women can be saved with early detection of ovarian cancer before it has spread into other areas of the body. Protect yourself by not taking for granted any symptoms which might appear and assuming they are caused by menopause, hormones, or even IBS. Visit the doctor for anything unusual which persists and doesn’t go away!

References:

www.medlineplus.gov

www.cancer.org

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